Tag Archives: metaldetector

If Indiana Jones was real


source : Mailonline

Secrets: The Beaufort-Spontin family were hounded out of the castle, above, and stripped of their possessions at the end of World War Two after they were accused of being Nazi collaborators

Secrets: The Beaufort-Spontin family were hounded out of the castle, above, and stripped of their possessions at the end of World War Two after they were accused of being Nazi collaborators

Thriller: The months-long game of cat-and-mouse with the Czech secret service ended with the treasure being pulled from under the floorboards in 1985

Thriller: The months-long game of cat-and-mouse with the Czech secret service ended with the treasure being pulled from under the floorboards in 1985

The chaffron – an antique head-protection for horses in battle – turned out to be a rare piece that had been looted from a French museum during the war, but Douglas did not know this when he accepted it as a present.

Years later, the chaffron would sell for a stunningly large amount of money, which helped Douglas fund other antiquity deals and, eventually, catapulted him into the heart of the hunt for the fabled golden shrine.

The Shrine of St Maurus was made between the years 1225 and 1230 on order from Gerard de Rumigni, bishop in the Belgian town of Florennes.

It was built to contain the bones of four Catholic saints, St Timotheus, St Apollinaris, St Maurus and most notably John the Baptist.

It was named after St Maurus because it is said to contain his entire skeleton, while only some bones from the other three saints are said to be inside. The Ark is described as a ‘Romansque relic of incalculable cultural, historic, religious and artic value’.

Yet when the monastery in Florennes was dissolved in the wake of the French Revolution, the stunning relic was later left in a nearby church.

It was found there in 1838 by Alfred, the 2nd Duke of Beaufort-Spontin, who purchased it for the price of 2,500 Francs and restored it to previous glory.

I had absolutely no idea what would follow. Otherwise I wouldn’t have done it. No treasure in the world is worth losing your life over
Danny Douglas

His family became its guardians, and it remained in their hands for generations. In 1888 the then duke, the head of a famous and important old Belgian noble family, brought the shrine to Castle Becov, the family’s Czech estate.

Along with other Sudeten-Germans, the then 65-year old and recently widowed Friedrich the 4th Duke of Beaufort-Spontin was expelled from Czechoslovakia in August 1945, accused of being a Nazi collaborator.

With only a suitcase in hand, the duke was sent across the border to Germany on foot, and Castle Becov and the family’s Czech belongings were seized by the Czechoslovak state.

But the shrine had disappeared and the family had taken its secrets with them.

And there it lay under the chapel floorboards for 40 years until Douglas was approached at a party in 1984 in Vienna – at that time a hotbed of spying activity – by Christian Beaufort-Spontin, art historian and the younger brother of the current 6th Duke of Beaufort-Spontin, also called Friedrich.

‘Christian approached me, and together we agreed that we would work together to get the shrine out of Czechoslovakia,’ says Douglas.

Christian never gave up on the family inheritance, but it wasn’t about personal ownership to him. He passionately wanted to liberate what he considered important cultural heritage and family history from the Soviet-Communist territory.

‘To be honest I have suppressed all memory of the ordeal as much as was possible,’ said Christian. He was reluctant to talk about the shrine at first, but eventually relinquished the secret that he kept for 30 years.

Stunning: The shrine is of 'incalculable value' and the Beaufort-Spontin's had hoped to sell it to a museum in Belgium and repatriate it from the Communist regime to the country where it was made

Stunning: The shrine is of ‘incalculable value’ and the Beaufort-Spontin’s had hoped to sell it to a museum in Belgium and repatriate it from the Communist regime to the country where it was made

Pride: The family had bought the relic in 1838 after it was found abandoned in a church in Florennes (above), Belgium, following the French Revolution

Pride: The family had bought the relic in 1838 after it was found abandoned in a church in Florennes (above), Belgium, following the French Revolution

‘My father gave me power of attorney that covered efforts and negotiations to recover our Czech belongings. I told him: ‘Maybe it will work out. Maybe we will manage to get the shrine out,’ but he didn’t believe in it. He didn’t want to know anything about it himself. To him the case had been closed in 1945,’ he said.

It wasn’t the first time the Beaufort-Spontin family had attempted to win back some of the things that were lost after the war. They had previously filed a formal request to have furniture and art works returned from Castle Becov, but the request never went anywhere.

So with Douglas, Christian proposed a desperate last attempt to recover the Shrine of St Maurus.

Douglas had set up a dog food import and sales firm in Vienna, and his many trips to visit customers and factories in the region gave him access to travel inconspicuously in and out of Soviet era Eastern Europe, including Czechoslovakia.

He was comfortable dealing with the authorities, and the two partners decided to pursue a formal approval for the project.

The plan was for Danny Douglas to approach the Czechoslovak authorities in Vienna with an offer to pay $500,000 for a search and export permit covering an unidentified object at an unspecified location.

He was asked to guarantee that the item wasn’t of Czechoslovak origin or of CSSR-cultural significance, and negotiations seemed to progress without major stumbling blocks.

Imagine sitting in meetings 3-4 hours at the time with a room full of spies and actually not say anything at all… It was extremely risky and stressful
Danny Douglas

‘I had absolutely no idea what would follow. Otherwise I wouldn’t have done it. No treasure in the world is worth losing your life over,’ he said.

The deal appeared to be on track, but getting the details in place kept dragging out. He kept travelling to meetings in Czechoslovakia, long meetings where he was quizzed by different people at each meeting.

‘Every time I went to Prague it was just me on one side of the table and ten officials on the other. They said they were historians, but I later found out three quarters of them were spies.

‘Imagine sitting in meetings 3-4 hours at the time with a room full of spies and actually not say anything at all, because anything that I did say might give the game away. It was extremely risky and stressful.’

That meetings were, however, the least of it. The secret police managed to piece the little information they got together and figure out what Douglas was after and where.

While Douglas kept coming back for meetings, the secret police were frantically digging holes at many different locations at the Becov estate, getting increasingly frustrated every time they came up empty-handed.

Frantisek Maryska, head of Czechoslovakia’s Federal bureau of investigation and the country’s spy chief, led the efforts personally.

He put a tail on Douglas and tapped his telephone. His detectives paid visits to and questioned friends and acquaintances, including the older Beaufort-Spontin brother. Two men that were quite obviously from the Czech secret police turned up at Friedrich Beaufort-Spontin’s house and asked him about the shrine, allegedly because a Czech museum was looking to build a replica of the lost relic.

Douglas was forced to cancel planned meetings and stopped travelling to Czechoslovakia out of fear that he would never return. He was convinced that his Czechoslovak opponents would stop at nothing to secure the shrine, that indeed his life was on the line – and rightly so documents from the archives of the Czech Interior and Foreign Ministries have revealed.

Ambition: Douglas's love of buying and selling antiquities was born when he enlisted in the US Army in Berlin

Ambition: Douglas’s love of buying and selling antiquities was born when he enlisted in the US Army in Berlin

Nemesis: Frantisek Maryska, the former head of the Czech FBI, stands alongside the 'lost ark' triumphantly after he beat Douglas to the prize

Nemesis: Frantisek Maryska, the former head of the Czech FBI, stands alongside the ‘lost ark’ triumphantly after he beat Douglas to the prize

Frustration: Maryska's men had dug numerous holes on the castle grounds in their desperate hunt for the treasure. It was only when Douglas mistakenly gave them a clue as to its whereabouts did they win the race

Frustration: Maryska’s men had dug numerous holes on the castle grounds in their desperate hunt for the treasure. It was only when Douglas mistakenly gave them a clue as to its whereabouts did they win the race

According to the documents, Frantisek Maryska filed a number of requests to his superiors in Prague asking for permission to initiate a number of extraordinary measures to make Douglas reveal the location of the shrine.

The measures, which were to be implemented by spies based at the Czechoslovakian embassy in Vienna, included abduction, torture and injection with truth serum.

The most exotic plan was to have a female agent seduce Danny Douglas and put him in a compromising situation that would allow her to blackmail him, the documents show.

Fortunately for Douglas, the requests were all turned down in Prague, not by Maryska’s immediate superiors, however, but by the Soviet advisors to the government. No reasons were given for the rejections, but it seems safe to assume that Danny Douglas’ American citizenship played an important role. They didn’t want to risk a diplomatic crisis.

Maryska almost gave up. But thanks to a slip of the tongue he eventually got the information he needed from Douglas. It happened by pure coincidence and he revealed how it happened to Douglas when the two foes finally met face to face years later.

Maryska told me that I had almost won. He said they had searched everywhere and had given up… But a small remark that I made at the very end gave the game away
Danny Douglas

‘He told me that I had almost won. He said they had searched everywhere and had given up and decided to sign the contract and let me find the shrine. But a small remark that I made at the very end gave the game away.’

Douglas explained: ‘They called to say they were ready to sign the contract. The plan was that after the signing we would locate the object together and I would then be able to take it away after it had been established that it fullfilled the specifications of the contracts.

‘They asked me what tools they should bring, and when I said we wouldn’t need any tools, they knew. They knew it was inside as it was winter and it meant there was no need to dig outside.’

A frantic 15-months-long game of cat and mouse had reached its conclusion. On November 5, 1985, Maryska and his men discovered the shrine and precious wines under the floorboards of Castle Becov’s chapel.

Maryska was declared a national hero and given 1,000 Czech Koruna and six wine glasses as a reward for his efforts.

Douglas, on the other hand wasn’t mentioned with a word. Eighteen years later, in 2003, he received a letter from Czech Minister of Culture, Pavel Dostal, acknowledging his role in recovering the shrine, but also emphasizing that he could not be publicly credited with the discovery.

‘Considering the fact that you were suppressing information about what object it was, you cannot be labelled as the finder,’ the minister wrote.

It took Czech authorities 11 years to properly restore the Shrine of St Maurus. It has since returned to Castle Becov, where it can be viewed in the castle museum’s permanent exhibition.

One of the people who have visited Castle Becov and admired the shrine is Christian Beaufort-Spontin.

‘It was my intention and hope to be able to sell it to a museum. I was hoping it could be sold to a Belgian museum so that it could return home where it belongs. It’s part of my family’s past and history,’ he said.

Good loser: Douglas with a letter from a Czech minister formally acknowledging his role in finding the treasure. But because of the nature of the hunt, he has never been publicly thanked

Good loser: Douglas with a letter from a Czech minister formally acknowledging his role in finding the treasure. But because of the nature of the hunt, he has never been publicly thanked

He never did tell his older brother of the failed recovery-attempt. It remained the secret of him, his father and Douglas. And the way it ended was and is to this day a source of embarrassment, he said.

‘I’m extremely tired and ashamed of the whole thing. It was done in such a stupid way. I was too young back then – today I would never have gone along with such a stupid plan,’ he said with an audible sigh.

Meanwhile, Maryska died shortly before Christmas last year in a hospital in Prague from heart and kidney failure. He was 68-years-old.

In Vienna, Douglas privately raised a glass in honour of his old adversary.

‘When we met I told him ‘you won because you had the entire government behind you and all the resources. I lost, but there was only me’. We didn’t part as enemies. At the end of the day, he was only doing his job, even if that did mean his agents tried to kill me.’

Revealed, the real-life Indiana Jones and the Lost Ark: Untold story of American fortune hunter’s deadly Cold War battle with Soviet spies to recover ancient shrine that ‘contains St John the Baptist’s bones’

  • Shrine of St Maurus was hidden under floor of castle chapel at end of WWII after family were driven from Czechoslovakia for being Nazi collaborators 
  • American fortune hunter Danny Douglas teamed up with the noble family to recover it from under the noses of Soviet spies during height of Cold War
  • Led to tense game of cat and mouse in which spies threatened to kidnap him or blackmail him by seducing him with good-looking female agent
  • In the end, a slip of the tongue led to Czech secret police finding the ark
  • Douglas tells his amazing story here for the first time ever 

Danny Douglas – the real-life Indiana Jones | Daily Mail Online <link rel=”stylesheet” type=”text/css” media=”all” href=”http://scripts.dailymail.co.uk/static/gunther/0.14.1/rc-main–.css” />

Douglas, a well-connected businessman in Viennese society, would eventually team up with a member of the Beaufort-Spontin family to mount a secret mission to recover the Ark.

In the following months Douglas was to be plunged into a tense game of cat-and-mouse with the Czech authorities.

And as we shall see, it was a game that he lost to Frantisek Maryska, Czechoslovakia’s head of the secret police, by only a whisker.

Douglas was born in Berlin in 1939 to a Jewish mother and an American father. As war broke out, his family managed to escape to London – but Douglas’ father and entire extended Jewish family died during the war. Nine years later, he lost his mother in a plane crash and was left orphaned and alone at age 11.

He was taken in by an Austrian nanny and friend of his mother’s, who brought him with her back to poor post-war Vienna, a young, lonely boy who fitted in poorly and dreamed of larger things in life.

Those dreams took him first to America, and then back to Europe as an enlisted man with the U.S. Army based in Berlin. It was here, while working as an interpreter, that he incidentally stumbled upon an antique chaffron in the house of a priest.

It’s a tale of mystery and intrigue, which includes an American fortune hunter, a hidden sacred holy treasure, Cold War spies and the Nazis.

If it were fiction it could even pass as the plot of a new Indiana Jones movie. But the discovery of the lost Shrine of St Maurus in the Czech Republic is a true story.

The shrine – said to contain the bones of St John the Baptist and three others of Christianity’s holiest figures – disappeared without trace as World War II was in its final throes.Priceless: The gold-covered, jewel-encrusted Shrine of St Maurus was made in 1220 to hold the remains of four saints, including bones of St John the Baptist

Priceless: The gold-covered, jewel-encrusted Shrine of St Maurus was made in 1220 to hold the remains of four saints, including bones of St John the Baptist

Indiana Jones: Danny Douglas was selected by the Beaufort-Spontin family to launch a clandestine mission to bring the ark back from where it had lain hidden under the floorboards of Becov Castle for 40 years

Indiana Jones: Danny Douglas was selected by the Beaufort-Spontin family to launch a clandestine mission to bring the ark back from where it had lain hidden under the floorboards of Becov Castle for 40 years

Indiana Jones: Danny Douglas was selected by the Beaufort-Spontin family to launch a clandestine mission to bring the ark back from where it had lain hidden under the floorboards of Becov Castle for 40 years

Painstakingly crafted in silver plate and encrusted with jewels, it was made around 1225 to house sacred relics, and although officially listed as belonging to Belgium, it had been taken secretly to Castle Becov in Bohemia in the 1880s.

There it lay under custodianship of the noble Beaufort-Spontin family, the guardians and protectors of the Ark until the end of the war when it was carefully hidden under the chapel floor to prevent it being looted by Soviet forces.

The family who had been its guardians for centuries were forced out of the country after being branded Nazi sympathizers. For years the family, who knew where the ancient relic was buried, plotted to regain one of Belgium’s most priceless historical treasures.

It was in 1984, when U.S. president Ronald Reagan was railing against the Red Scare and the Kremlin had tightened its grip on Eastern Europe even further, that Danny Douglas, an AMerican with a sense of adventure, became a central character of this intrigue.

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The best places in England for unearthing lost treasure


  • 17 January 2016
Stuart Elton, metal detectoristImage copyright Laurence Cawley
Image caption Metal detectorist Stuart Elton says nearly every field in Essex hides some kind of Roman artefact

Data shows Norfolk is the best spot for treasure hunters. But is everything as it seems?

Of all the treasures found in the ground, fewer than 5% are discovered by professional archaeologists. More than 90% are unearthed by amateur treasure hunters armed with metal detectors – devices originally devised for hunting down landmines.

Recent finds include a hoard of Roman coins in Herefordshire, a collection of Norman and Anglo-Saxon coins in Buckinghamshire and collection of Viking jewellery in North Yorkshire.

But one county in England boasts more treasure finds each year than Herefordshire, Buckinghamshire and North Yorkshire combined: Norfolk.

Coroner figures (treasure is declared such by coroners) for the past three years reveal the county has on average 116 treasure finds a year, followed by Essex with 71, Suffolk with 65 and Lincolnshire with 59.

Coventry, Bristol and the City of York, on the other hand, have not had a single treasure declaration in three years.

So why is the east of the country such a treasure hotspot?

Treasure mapImage copyright Tableau

Archaeologist Ben Robinson believes the answer lies in a mix of land use and history.

“There’s a rich tapestry of habitation in East Anglia and that history has left its legacy in the soil.

“And then comes the plough, turning that soil over each year, bringing new finds towards the surface.”

Because finds must be at least 300 years old to be classified as treasure, artefacts from the industrial revolution in major cities such as Manchester, Leeds and Birmingham do not figure.

Similarly, because of the precious metal criteria surrounding treasure, the metallic artefacts of the steel city of Sheffield do not register either.

“You don’t get much from the modern major cities,” said Michael Lewis, head of portable antiquities and treasure at the Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS). “In London, most of the finds come from mudlarks on the foreshore of the Thames.”

line break

Treasure is…

Any object that is at least 300 years old when found and:

  • is one of at least two coins in the same find with a precious metal content of at least 10%
  • if the precious metal content is less than 10%, is one of at least 10 coins in the same find
  • is not a coin but has precious metal content of at least 10%
  • is any object of any material found in the same place as another object that is deemed treasure
  • any group of two or more metallic objects of any composition of prehistoric date that come from the same find
  • is an object substantially made from gold or silver but is less than 300 years old
line break

The BBC’s map of treasure does seem to reflect the sites of the much older major cities such as Norwich, Lincoln, York, Bristol, Ipswich and Winchester.

But while finds might reflect historical areas of settlement, far more important, says Dr Lewis, are the activities of the people who make the finds.

East Anglia – an area of arable farmland – and the flats of Lincolnshire are simply easier to metal detect on than hilly farmland in, say, Cumbria or the Pennines.

Metal detectorists cannot detect in built-up urban environments, meaning town centre finds – such as the Fenwick Treasure in Colchester – are nearly always made by archaeologists brought in as part of a redevelopment.

In the 1980s, archaeologists and metal detectorists were at war over the nation’s subterranean heritage.

But in the 20 years since the PAS set out clear guidance for the reporting of finds by the public, the relationship between responsible detectorists and archaeologists has thawed.

Treasure from the Staffordshire HoardImage copyright Getty Images
Image caption Treasure from the Staffordshire hoard, the largest collection of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork ever found. It was discovered in 2009 by metal detectorist Terry Herbert
FLO Ben PaitesImage copyright Laurence Cawley
Image caption Ben Paites is the lone finds liaison officer for Essex, one of the country’s treasure hunting hotspots

All finds should be reported to one of the country’s 37 finds liaison officers (FLO). Between them, they have collated details of more than one million finds since the scheme started.

Dr Lewis said of the 80,000 finds reported each year only 1,000 or so were treasure.

The location of treasure finds also reflects the regional vibrancy of a metal detecting as a hobby and – in some instances – the talent of the detectorist.

“Some people seem to find lots of stuff while others hardly ever find anything,” he said. “The fact is some people are better at metal detecting than others.”

Ben Paites, the FLO for Essex, says some areas have a “culture of reporting” finds.

“Before the Treasure Act came into effect and before the PAS was established, only a few museums really interacted with metal detectorists who were finding these things,” he said.

PC Andy Long has found illegal treasure hunters digging up the ground of scheduled ancient monuments such as the site of St Peter's Chapel at Bradwell in EssexImage copyright Laurence Cawley
Image caption PC Andy Long has found illegal treasure hunters digging up the ground of scheduled ancient monuments such as the site of St Peter’s Chapel at Bradwell in Essex

The first areas to have FLOs were Kent, Norfolk, the West Midlands, North Lincolnshire, north-west England and Yorkshire. Four of these regions feature towards the top of the treasure finds list.

But sadly some treasure finds – the exact number will never be known – pass under the radar.

While some might not be reported out of ignorance of the rules, others are the result of people, known as night hawks, deliberately metal detecting without permission.

PC Andy Long, Essex Police’s wildlife and heritage crime officer and the national intelligence lead for the anti-night hawking effort Operation Chronos, says treasure thieves are not just stealing artefacts, they are stealing history.

“Beneath the ground there’s an enormous amount of history and in time it will be recovered – but we need to know the historical context in which things are found.

“Once it is gone, it’s gone forever.”

Sites such as the Roman fort and early Christian church site at Bradwell on Sea have been left pockmarked with hundreds of holes.

St Peter's Church at Bradwell on SeaImage copyright Laurence Cawley
Image caption St Peter’s Church at Bradwell on Sea was built on the site of a Roman fort

Badgers were the first suspects. But PC Long is in no doubt it was the result of night hawks (who, he points out, often dig during the day).

“Animals don’t dig using a flat-sided object, Nor do they pat the ground back on top of the hole or take out a ring-pull and leave it by the side of the hole.

“We don’t know what has been taken, if anything.”

Do metal detectorists treading the fields of a treasure hotspot actually expect near-instant riches?

“Some people do it to get rich,” says Essex detectorist Stuart Elton, “though they are usually the people who have just bought a detector.

“I do it for the history,” he says. “I think that is why most of us do it.”

His preferred term for what he does is “dry land fishing”. Or walking with a purpose.

An Inside Out East feature on treasure hunting will be broadcast on BBC One in the east of England at 19:30 GMT and available on iPlayer afterwards

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What A Rush! California Couple Finds Gold Coins Worth $10M


 

  

Thar's gold in them thar cans: One of the eight cans discovered by a California couple. They were stuffed with gold coins minted in the 1800s. The cache's estimated value: $10 million.

Thar’s gold in them thar cans: One of the eight cans discovered by a California couple. They were stuffed with gold coins minted in the 1800s. The cache’s estimated value: $10 million. Kagin’s Inc./AP hide caption

toggle caption Kagin’s Inc./AP

Thar’s gold in them thar cans: One of the eight cans discovered by a California couple. They were stuffed with gold coins minted in the 1800s. The cache’s estimated value: $10 million.

Kagin’s Inc./AP

If you’ve ever dreamed about finding buried treasure, this story’s for you:

A California couple who say they had walked by the same spot on their Sierra Nevada property many times over many years are an estimated $10 million or so richer after digging up eight rusty old cans containing 1,427 very valuable gold coins. It’s thought to be the most valuable discovery of such coins in U.S. history.

Identified for now only as “John and Mary,” the lucky landowners tell Kagin’s Inc. — a numismatic firm that has examined the coins and is representing the couple — that they had in the past noticed an old can sticking from up the ground.

“We thought the can might be a place for someone to put flowers in for a gravesite — something which would have been typical” in years past, John says in an interview posted on the firm’s website.

But during a walk last year along a part of their property that they call Saddle Ridge, John and Mary wondered whether the can might also be a marker of some sort. So they did a little digging — literally.

By the time they were done, they had recovered coins that were minted mostly in San Francisco from 1847 to 1894 and have a total face value of nearly $28,000. Many are in almost pristine condition. Kagin’s estimates they will sell for about $10 million. The most valuable of the coins, writes the Los Angeles Times, is an 1866-S No Motto Double Eagle worth about $1 million.

John and Mary tell Kagin’s that they plan to keep some of the coins, sell many of them and donate some of their windfall to charities.

One of our favorite parts of their story is what they did with the coins immediately after the discovery.

“The first thing the family did after finding all the cans was rebury them in a cooler under their woodpile,” David McCarthy of Kagin’s tells the San Francisco Chronicle. “They were terrified and had to think about what to do.”

Or, as John tells Kagin’s: “Yeah — the old-timers had it right — it’s safer than in a bank!”

WHY ARE THEY SO VALUABLE?

Experts say paper money was illegal in California until the 1870s, so it’s extremely rare to find any coins from before that period. Additionally, most of the coins are in mint condition, having been stashed away seemingly immediately after they were minted. They were valued by Don Kagin, a numismatist who is handling the sale and marketing of the coins.

 

 

 

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Il Metaldetector NON e’ Reato!!


Detectorist,Per quanto mi riguarda questo fantastico Hobby e’  la mia piu’ grande passione, vita e  miracolo di Dio, ma  purtoppo non e’ ancora conosciuto molto bene in paesi “civilzati” come l”Italia.err

Quando mi trovo a parlare in Italia con qualcuno e provo ad esprimere la mia grande passione per la  ricerca con il cercametalli, appunto Metaldetector mi guardano con una faccia   che esprime un vuoto totale e pensano: ” Tombarolo!!!!  Pensano loro …..

Pensano si , ma li perdono e cerco di spiegare cosa esattamenta fa un tombarolo e cosa facciamo noi  “Detectorist”.

La mia esperinza con il metaldetector puo’ essere definita non da principiante anche se uso un Metaldetector Garret 250 che si puo’ considerare uno strumento base per chi vuole avvicinare a questo fantastico Hobby. Avendo girato gran parte del  mondo ho sempre colto l’occasione di utilizzare il mio Md (metaldetector) in posti come Australia, Inghilterra, Scozia, Indonesia e purtroppo anche in Italia. Si in Italia ho avuto dei grandi momenti specialmente  durante la ricerca  WW2  nel  Nord d’Italia, prima del nuovo tesserino per la ricerca di reperti di Guerra, cosa che approvo al 100%.  potete trovare informazioni su questo sito Metal Detector per tutti

Purtoppo pero’ non mi sentivo a mio agio anche seguendo le regole. Forse perche’ non ci sono regole al momento.

Qui il mio canale per chi volesse  iscriversi

untdferfitled       DEEP WORLD METALDETECTOR

 

Tra l’altro  in  Inghilterra sono state create delle mini serie  TV che vi consiglio di guardare, almeno io mi ci sono immedesimato al 100%.  La serie si chiama Detectorist, sono 2 serie assolutamente fantastiche, che raccontano oltre alla passione del MD anche situazioni di vita familiar, qualcuna delle quali mi rispecchia particolarmente.

Serie 1 dalla BBC Inglese

By Jasper Rees

6:45AM GMT 30 Oct 2015

Detectorists is about men on the ep027q4n1dge of things. Andy (Mackenzie Crook) and Lance (Toby Jones) are beta males panning for gold in England’s green and pleasant (but unyielding) land. Better make that gamma males. One’s jobless, the other’s “going through a period of voluntary chastity”. They have knowledge of daytime quiz shows. And yet a deep bond of mutual understanding – and the dream of unearthing more than ring-pulls – sustains them against the hurtful blows of the indifferent fates.

Crook’s series, back for another rummage in the Anglo-Saxon subsoil of bromance and bathos, is that rare find: a truthful comedy about decent losers. Since the first series, Andy’s less than plausible girlfriend (Rachael Stirling) had borne a child for him to look after while she worked. The task of deriding his inadequacies had passed to his terse new mother-in-law, played by Stirling’s actual mother Diana Rigg.

Meanwhile in detectorism the second series began very much as you were. Last time Andy and Lance headed home with their detectors just inches away from a glinting Iron Age hoard which would have changed their lives. This time, first we were eventfully swept back to the rain-lashed Middle Ages where, as sword-wielding plunderers approached, a panicking monk buried church valuables. Centuries later, Lance and Andy left off for the day, moments from another bullseye. Nearly men.

 

Serie 2

metal_3043549b

 

Tornando nel paese dei balochhi …..

Cosa dice la legge  Italiana a riguardo?

In Italia???? stai scherzando vero???  Sei in Italia……. Non esiste una particolare legge che regola l’utilizzo di questo strumento anche se e’ di libera vendita in TUTTI  negozi del mondo.

Posso consigliare di utilizzare questo codice Inglese e regolamento adottato da tutti. Credo che sia l’unico al quale si possa fare riferimento.

Qui potete scaricare il regolamento Inglese.

   CofP1    advice for finders

 

 

 

 

advice%20for%20findersCofP1

 

 

 

 

 

Tornando in Italia, cosa si puo’ o non si puo’?

  1.  Il Metaldetector e SEVERAMENTE  vietato in zone archeologiche o interesse archeologico.
  2. untitefwerfled
    Ti arresto, non so perche’ ma ti faccio un culo cosi’

    E’ necessaria l’autorizzazione del proprietario del terreno e seguire le stesse normative di Caccia e Pesca.

  3. … e qui viene il bello……… qualsiasi oggetto  raccolto che abbia piu’ di 50 anni e’ da consegnare alle autorita’ perche’ potrebbe essere oggetto di interesse. Una volta consegnato alle autorita’ e’ capitato che quell’oggetto sparisce e la maggior parte delle volte quando  si torna a controllare se  il proprietario ha fatto la denuncia,  l’oggetto in questione non si trova…. queste sono testimonianze di persone a cui e’ capitato , anche piu’ di una volta.                                                                                                                  ( questo quando lo racconto in Inghiltera mi cacciano via da casa perche’ pensano che li prendo in giro)
  4. nel caso di ritrovamento archeologico deve essere consegnato alle autorita’ entro 24 ore.
  5. La consegna del bene al museo che per legge dovrebbe riconoscerti una piccolo percentuale, ma ………..

Ora qui c’e’ da discutere

  •  Secondo le autorita’ non esiste il ritrovamento fortuito perche’ hai usato il Metaldetector, quindi lo sei andato a cercare.
  • per i Beni Archeologici non puoi toccare l’oggetto in questione ( 50 anni e piu’) altrimenti potresti essere denunciato come Tombarolo, pero’ lo devi consegnare alle autorita’ e  quindi non lasciarlo incustodito. Chiama e aspetta un giorno intero con rischio di denuncia, multa, sequestro del MD e perquisizione a casa. Multe fino a 6.000 euro!!!

 

 

Ora vi spiego come funziona in Inghilterra   

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Il museo e’ interessato all’acquisto

   qui il sito ufficiale

 

  1. Chiedere il permesso al proprietario del terreno qui potete scaricare una copia da utilizzare anche in Italia   01_Permit_Template,  LANDOWNER
  2. E’ vietato nelle zone Archeologiche e di interesse Archeologico, ma se si dovesse trovare qualcosa di interesante lo si puo’ consegnare al Museo Archeologico di competenza e se interessa viene acquistato dal Museo stesso dove ti viene riconosciuta una targa con il tuo nome ed esposto per la gioia di tutti!.  Il premio viene condiviso al 50% con il proprietario del terreno.   guarda questo interessante articolo qui,    un’altro
  3. oggetti con eta’ maggiore di 50 anni……. lo puoi tenere.

Ora io sono disposto a muovermi  con il  vostro aiuto nel cercare di regolamentare questo anche in Italia. Vorrei davvero che noi Detectorist fossimo uniti nel creare una legge che possa permetterci di utilizzare  MD in modo civile e consapevole.

Quando esco con il mio MD prima di tutto faccio ricerca anche su Google Map, studio la storia del posto, controllo le batterie e non ci dormo tutta la notte.

A volte sono uscito alle 8 di sera e sono tornato alle 8 di mattina, guarda il video qui

 

Mi raccomando coprite sempre le buche,  raccogliete tutta la spazzatura che trovate e gettatela negli appositi contenitori, rispettate la natuta , gli animali,  portatevi con voi acqua, pane e mortadella ( non buttate la carta).

Coinvolgete i vostri figli, fateli appassionare alla ricerca